Category Archives: Film Grammar

Internet Grammar # 1 – Jocelyn Gecker, Associated Press

I just read an article about the Millennium Tower which was posted yesterday. Here you go. Leaning San Francisco Tower Seen Sinking From Space by Jocelyn Gecker, Associated Press San Francisco, Novembeer 28, 2016 “The satellite data shows the Millennium … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 12 – Marvel, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., Season 4, Episode 4

Daisy (Chloe Bennet) to Coulson (Clark Gregg): “Thank you for saving Simmons and I back there.” Okay, the rule is very clear and very simple: a subject is a subject and an object is an object. And the test for … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 11 – The Americans, Season 4, Episode 7, “Travel Agents”

Philip and Elizabeth’s son Henry Jennings (Keidrich Sellati) is visiting Matthew Beeman (Danny Flaherty), who is drinking beer. Henry asks, “Can I have one?” Matthew is doubtful, and Henry says, “It’s not like I’ve never drank beer before.” Come on, … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 10 – Atlantis Found, The History Channel

Narrator: “Using the echo-sounding data, the team have been able to create a hugely detailed 3D map.” No, the word “team” is singular. Like “group”, or “club”, or “collection”, or “cult”. So the script he was reading should have read, … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 9 – Signed, Sealed, Delivered: From Paris with Love

If you’re going to complain about bad grammar (and I am), you should certainly laud good grammar when you find it, and the programs and movies under the heading “Signed, Sealed, Delivered”, on first Hallmark Channel and now Hallmark Movies … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 8 – Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. – Season 2, Episode 20 – “Scars”

Skye to Coulson: “Let Lincoln and I go first.” Would ANYONE say, “Let I go first?” So this goes beyond trying to make characters sound like people. But hey, if the writers hated the correct “Let Lincoln and me go … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 7 AND Dumb Caption # 16 – a Weight Watchers commercial

In this commercial, shown fairly recently but now replaced, an actress says, “If you wake up hungry, if you show up at the office and there’s doughnuts and you weren’t expecting them….” “there IS doughnuts?” I don’t think so! And … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 6 – Surviving Exodus, Animal Planet 12-4-2014

Dave Salmoni said, “I’ve probably swam with every kind of shark you can think of.” Two mistakes here: the wrong verb tense (should be “I’ve probably SWUM…”) and ending the sentence with a preposition. Now, I recently got a comment … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 5 – Grimm, Season 2, Episode 6

Nick to Juliette: Did you mean what you said about me being a Grimm? Later somebody told Adalind: It was a bit of a mistake, you going to Portland. A verb with ING added is called a gerund. It is … Continue reading

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Film Grammar # 4 – Where the Boys Are (1960)

Chill Wills, as the Chief of Police at Fort Lauderdale to his forces at the start of Spring Break: “I want every man on the force to try his best, his level best, to try to avoid arresting anyone.” Well, … Continue reading

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